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Publications:

ARRL 11th CNC 1992

11th.jpeg

This proceeding is available on CD-ROM


Location:
Teaneck, New Jersey

Coordinator:

Hosted by:
Radio Amateur Telecommunications Society (RATS)
American Radio Relay League (ARRL)

Abstracts:
11th Computer Networking Conference
November 7, 1992

Packet Radio at 19.2 kB - A Progress Report
by John Ackermann, AG9V
Overview: This article briefly describes the technical aspects of the 19.2kB backbone and metropolitan area network (MAN) now operating in Southwestern Ohio.

Proceedings Paper



Telemetry Adapter for the TNC-2
by Bill Beech, NJ7P and Jack Taylor, N700
Abstract: This paper describes a modification for the TNC-2 to allow 16 bits of digital I/O and 16 channels of analog to digital conversion.

Proceedings Paper



Automatic AX.25 Position and Status Reporting
by Bob Bruninga, WB4APR
Abstract: For the last two years the Naval Academy has used a packet radio network for communications with its boats during summer cruises. The packet radio system not only provides the connectivity typical in AX.25 radio networks for the exchange of messages, but the automatic beacons from the afloat units provide near realtime position reporting of.the units at sea. The purpose of this article is to describe the Academy system, particularly the use of beacons for position and status reporting and to suggest the advanatages of such a system for use in emergency situations and network management in other AX.25 packet systems. Detailed formats for automatic position and status reporting are provided. In any communication network for any purpose, station location and status reporting are at least the second most important function, if not the first.

Proceedings Paper



Fast Amateur Link Controller - an allround solution using a SCSI bus
by Werner Cornelius, DG3DBI
Abstract: Two years ago fastening of interlinks and user entries called into being the project FALCon (Fast Amateur Link Controller). Final aim of this project is to develop hard- and software conceptions answering new and wider requirements (higher baud rates for example). The project was initiated by DG3DBI aiming at the development of new and powerful hardware for digipeaters and terminal node controllers. Exchanging ideas with Thomas, DLlEBQ, sysop of the German digipeater DBOME was followed by Thomas offer to test newly developed hardware at DBOME. Because of lack of time the software development was given to Walter, DG9EP, an experienced programmer, who set up a wholly new software for use at digipeaters - DigiWare. Following, development and fundamental characteristics of the hardware - FALCon - are described.

Proceedings Paper



Heathnet Versus HF Packet in Mozambique
by Phil Gray, KA7TWQ/C9RPG
Abstract: Details of one HF Packet Radio network that failed after a four year attempt at implementation contrasted with one that was

Proceedings Paper



Some Recent Amateur Use of Federal Standard Automatic Link Establishment (ALE) Signaling
by Bob Levreault, W1IMM, and Ken Wickwire, KB1JY
Abstract: This paper describes some recent experience on the HF bands with equipment operating according to the new federal standard for automatic link establishment (ALE. Some data collected on authorized frequencies outside the ham bands (where interference is less bothersome) are also presented to illustrate some of the analysis possibilities offered by ALE systems.

Proceedings Paper



The ROSE X.25 Packet Switch Application: CWID
by Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is introduce and describe the CWID application for the ROSE X.25 Packet Switch. In certain countries the need to support this function has been raised as a regulatory issue. Now, at the option of the System Manager, the CWID application may be loaded and conform to this requirement.

Proceedings Paper



The ROSE X.25 Packet Network MS-DOS Device Driver
by Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY, and J. Gordon Beattie, Jr., N2DSY
Introduction: There has always existed a great barrier to the casual programmer (a.k.a. hacker) who wants to write a program that communicates with another system. The process of buffering and sending and receiving characters is tedious and wards off all but the very committed programmers. The ROSE X.25 Packet Network MS-DOS Device Driver is going to redefine the rules as far as how hard it is to establish and maintain a connection through a packet network.

Proceedings Paper



ROSE X.25 Packet Switch Status Update
by Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY, and J. Gordon Beattie, Jr., N2DSY
Introduction: The ROSE X.25 Packet Switch has been under development for over six years. In this time, we have developed an implementation which encompasses the original design objectives, as well as requirements raised by the evolving needs of the Amateur Radio packet community. This paper describes several unique and interesting features of the Switch and introduces new features implemented in the latest release of the software.

The past two years we have seen much growth in the popularity and support for the ROSE X.25 Switch. Much of the southeastern United States, from Florida to Texas, Oklahoma to Tennessee, and on to Georgia is running ROSE. In this network, connections spanning 400 miles are not uncommon.

Proceedings Paper



The Clover-II Communication Protocol Technical Overview
by Raymond C. Petit, W7GHM
Abstract: This paper describes the CLOVER-II adaptive modulation controller, Reed-Solomon error-correcting coder, and selective-repeat ARQ algorithm. These operations are coordinated to obtain high-performance narrowband data communication over HF radio paths.

Proceedings Paper



The German (Central European) Packet Radio Network: An Overview
by Wolf-Henning Rech, N1EOW/DF91C, and Johannes Kneip, DG3RBU
Abstract: Packet radio operation in Europe made its beqinnings in larger scale in the mid-80s. First access was made in the two-meter-band, but soon the sinqle available channel (144,675 MHz) used to be overcrowded in densely populated areas. Because there is significantly less space for amateur radio frequencies in Europe our packet radio network was successfully estabilshed in the 70cm and 23cm band during the last 8 years. Tab.1 summarizes an overview of German frequency allocation for amateur radio and its packet radio usage between 50 and 2000 MHz; requlations in other European countries is similar but more restricted at most.

Proceedings Paper



PACTOR: An Overview of a New and Effective HF Data Communication Protocol
by Gwyn Reedy, W1BEL
Abstract: Data commllnicationvia amateur radio HF frequency has recently become more effective and enjoyable due to a new communication protocol called PACIOR was developed by two enterprising German amateurs, DL6MAA and DF4KV This article is based on the information provided by these gentlemen in their various writings.

Proceedings Paper



Low-Cost Entry into Packet Radio Using Digicom
by Christopher C. Rendenna, KB2BBW
Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide information on setting up a low cost packet radio system via the Digicom modem and software. It assumes the reader is minimally computer literate and has a basic knowledge and understanding of packet radio basics.

Proceedings Paper



Using ROSE X.25 Packet Networks
by Bill Slack, NX2P, Don Rotolo, N2IRZ, Andrew Funk, KB7UV, and Thomas A. Moulton, W2VY
Abstract: Some find ROSE X.25 Packet Network operation a mystery. this is likely due to simply a lack of information and/or experience with this approach to packet networking. This paper is a slightly modified version of the Users Guide distributed by the Radio Amateur Telecommunications Society (RATS) to users of the RATS-operated ROSE X.25 Packet Network. It is presented here to help familiarize others with ROSE X.2 5 Packet Network features and operations.

Proceedings Paper



Sophisticated Mail User Interface Systems
by Keith Sproul, WU2Z, and Mark Sproul, KB2ICI
Abstract: Most of us use many different electronic mail systems such as the Internet, Usenet, CompuserveTM, America-OnlineTM, GenielM, ProdigyTM, and of course Amateur Radio Packet Mail. Most of these E-Mail systems have had some sort of sophisticated user interface developed for them. For Usenet, there are many different News Reader programs. Compuserve has CIS Navigator and CIS Information Manager. Many of us also use some sort of Local Area Network-based E-Mail systems at our work. LAN- based E-Mail systems such as Microsoft MailTM are extremely sophisticated, especially those that run on windowing environments such as the MacintoshTM and Microsoft WindowsTM.

With very few exceptions we all get paper mail delivered to our homes. We don't have to go to the post office to pick it up each day. The current packet mail systems require that we go to the post office (BBS) each day and ask for our mail. We also must ask for a list of public messages and explicitly specify which ones we want to see. Then we wait for 1200 baud data to come across the busy air waves.

A sophisticated user interface that would take care of retrieving a user's messages and specified bulletin topics would be a significant improvement. Such a system should deliver the mail that a user wants to his desktop, without the user having to go and get it manually. Such a system may also be expanded to then forward the mail to a user via another mail system so that the individual uses only one program at his computer. The authors have developed a Packet Mail reader system that implements many of the sophisticated features seen in other mail systems. This same program can also gateway mail between Packet Mail and Microsoft Mail for the Macintosh.

Proceedings Paper



HAPN-2: A Digital Multi-Mode Controller for the IBM PC
by John Vanden Berg, VE3DW
Abstract: This paper describes a universal controller card for the IBM-PC bus. This system consists of one (or more) dual channel HAPN-2 adapter cards for packet radio. The basic card also has circuitry for experimenting with other modes such as R~IY, AMTOR, WEFAX, CW and SSTV.

Proceedings Paper



NOSVIEW: The On-Line Documentation Package for NOS
by Ian Wade, G3NRW
Abstract: NOSview is an on-line documentatlon package for the KA9Q Network Operating System (NOS). Flrst released in September 1991, NOSVIEW Is a complete reference work descrlblng In detall all of the commands to be found In the malor NOS releases. This paper outlines its main features, and how to get a copy.

Proceedings Paper



Network Enhancements Implemented in the CT/NJ/NY Region
by Frank Warren, Jr., KB4CYC, Andrew Funk, KB7UV, and Scott Weiss, KB2EAR
Abstract: The problems of the prolifferation of flood routings, widespread mesh forwarding and an ever-expanding system census had combined to reach a point where the PBBS network in the CT/NJ/NY tri-state region was in dire need of an overhaul. This paper details the approaches taken by the majority of systems in the region to address these problems.

Proceedings Paper



RMAILER: A Remote Ad Hoc Mailing List Expander
by Frank Warren, Jr., KB4CYC, and Andrew Funk, KB7UV
Abstract: The ROSErver/PRMBS BBS system supports a remote ad hoc mailing list protocol known as RMAIL (Remote MAILer). ROSE/RMAIER provides RMAIL support for other BBS systems operating under MS-DOS.

Proceedings Paper



SOFTKISS: TNC-Less Packet for the Macintosh
by Aaron Wohl, N3LIW
Abstract: This paper presents the design and implementation of a software TNC emulator for the Macintosh called SoftKiss. The tools used to build Softkiss are described. These tools will be useful for any Macintosh device driver development. Macintosh TNC less packet is compared to IBM PC TNC less packet.

Proceedings Paper



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