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Publications:

ARRL and TAPR 17th DCC Proceedings 1998

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NOTE Proceedings for conferences prior to the 25th are no longer available separately. For details Read more ...

This proceeding is only available on CD-ROM


Location:
Chicago, Illinois

Coordinators:
Greg Jones, WD5IVD
Steve Stroh, N8GNJ

Hosted by:
Chicago Amateur Packet Radio Association (CAPRA)
Packet Radio Users Group of Japan (PRUG)


Read the conference story with audio and photos.


Abstracts:
17th ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference
September 25-27, 1998

Whats New for APRS in 1999
by Bob Bruninga, WB4APR
Introduction: Since APRS was first introduced at the 1992 TAPR/ARRL Digital Communications Conference it has evolved to fulfill a growing need for tactical real-time digital communications. Trying to describe its usefulness is similar to describing amateur radio itself. The scope is so broad and the applications so widespread, that no single listing can be complete. Major milestones in that evolution were the transition from hand entered maps to the USGS CD ROMS, in 1994, the development of MacAPRS in 1994 by Keith and Mark Sproul followed by the official WinAPRS version in 1995. In 1997 Brent Hildebrand developed a special application called APRS+SA to take advantage of the very popular Delorme Street Atlas CD ROM maps. This improvement in maps to the street level was completed recently with the full integration of Precision Maping system into the WinAPRS product in 1998. Along the way, Steve Dimse's javAPRS began the great migration of APRS onto the information super highway in 1996 by making APRS tracking available to anyone with a WEB browser, culminating in his debut of APRServe at the 1997 DCC in Baltimore Maryland which provides a worldwide Internet backbone for all APRS packet. Covered in paper: APRS National Freq, Internet Gateways, APRS digis, Digis in 1999, Mobile Satellite Network, Channel Capacity for 1999, Kenwood APRS Handheld communicator.

Proceedings Paper



Internet to RF Messaging within APRS
by Steve Dimse, K4HG
Abstract: This paper describes a new feature implemented within APRS system, which allows transparent messaging between stations on the Internet and RF sides of the network, as well as on two distant RF networks using the Internet as a link.

Proceedings Paper



Co-evolution of Print, Computer, and Radio Technologies
by Roy Ekberg, W0LIQ and Martin Schroedel, K9LTL
Abstract: This is about standards for CAC (Computer Assisted Communications) proposed first in the 12th and 16th DCC proceedings. Our CAC Model 17 was entered in the ARRL's library under C-135-1. R&D work began in 1989 and continues.

Proceedings Paper



Optimized Channel ccess Mechanisms for Decentralized Spread Spectrum Packet Networks
by Matthew Ettus, N2MJI
Abstract: In a Spread Spectrum (SS) network with cooperative, minimum-energy routing, latency grows with the number of stations in the network due to the increasing number of hops which a packet must take en route to its destination. This is the principal factor limiting the number of stations in the network. Previously proposed channel access mechanisms for these networks were principally concerned with collision avoidance, to the detriment of latency, especially in light or moderately loaded networks. Additionally, while avoiding extremely low SNRs due to collisions, better results are obtainable for average SNR. Several new channel access mechanisms are proposed and simulated for the purpose of addressing the issues stated above. The results obtained indicated that there is potential for significant improvement in performance through the use of alternative channel access procedures.

Proceedings Paper



IP-Shield Machine (IPSM): An Ethernet Interface for HIgh-Speed Packet Radio
by Satoshi Funada, 7M3LCG
Abstract: In PRUG96 project, we developed an Ethernet interface for high-speed digital transceiver, called IPSM-ZZ. IPSM deals with a only Media Access Control layer protocol. With its partner, Protocol Server deals with upper layer protocols. It allows us to develop upper layer protocols flexibly in common operating systems..

Proceedings Paper



PIC-et Radio: How to Send AX.25 UI Frames Using INexpensive PIC Microprocessors
by John Hansen, W2FS
Abstract: This paper provides step by step documentation of how to implement AX.25 UI frames using inexpensive PIC microcontrollers. It is designed primarily for those who wish to implement packet radio UI beacons for point to multipoint communications. The article assumes some knowledge of programming concepts and PIC microprocessors. It also discusses the limitations that must be overcome in order to build a completely PIC based terminal node controller.

Proceedings Paper



A New Vision for the Amateur Radio Service
by Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP and Greg Jones, WD5IVD
Abstract: Amateur radio as a hobby has reached an important turning point. Many can point to the various examples of why things are changing; however, some of these examples are real and some are only periodic in nature, but the trend of activity and interest now as compared to five years or even ten years ago is changing. This paper discusses issues that need to be addressed with regards to technology changes in amateur radio.

Proceedings Paper



APRS QSY from 145.79 to 144.39
by Greg Jones, WD5IVD, Frank Bauer, KA3HDO, Stan Horzepa, WA1LOU, and Steve Dimse, K4HG
Abstract: This paper describes the successful APRS QSY that was begun at the 1997 ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference. It covers some of the issues and reasons behind the project. See the APRS QSY Page.

Proceedings Paper



Back to the Packet Radio with MACA
by Ikuko Kawamura, Hideyuki Ishinaka, and Hiroshi Matsuno, JH4CIN
Introduction: Karn Introduced MACA in which was designed for packet radio network. It was used as the basis for the IEEE802.11 LAN standard. Thereafter, based on simulation studies of MACA, Bharghaven et al. fine tuned MACA to improve its performance and renames their new protocol MACAW. In this paper, we first investigate the performance of MACA under the no hidden terminal situation. By an analytic way, we will compare the throughputs of MACA and CSMA. We the review CSMA and some kind of protocols considered as extended versions of CSMA, and point out that MACA has an ability to get the throughput exceeding one. A suggestion in conclusion in this paper will remind us that we are people who love amateur radio and have some interests in computer.

Proceedings Paper



Spread Spectrum in the Amateur Radio Service: Current Status and Histroical Notes
by Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP and Barry McLarnon, VE3JF
Abstract: This paper covers the current status of Spread Spectrum operations: Amateur SS in the USA, Amateur SS in other countries, What We've learned so far about spread spectrum operations and what they way ahead looks like.

Proceedings Paper



Current Status of Amateur Spread Spectrum in Japan
by Katsuhiko Morosawa, JH0MRP
Abstract: We have practiced field tests using our PRUG96 system with SS transceivers, where we performed the 30km distance QSO. The output power of the transceiver is only about 30mW and the front gain of the antenna is 21dbi. We also confirmed that our system enables us to use the internet applications ('web browsing', 'videoconference' and so on) with practical speed.

Proceedings Paper



A New Routing Method Based on Station ID
by Norito Nemoto, JH1FBM
Abstract: There are two problems on routing packets by means of IP address in a seamlessly wide area radio networks: (1) conflicting IP address on routing information and (2) little flexibility to accommodate and isolate the differences among local network policies. To solve them, it is important to use a routing method based on the callsign of radio station. A new method is presented in this paper with an emphasis on the use of the callsign. This protocol employs Station ID (SID), which is a combination of classign and a system number.

Proceedings Paper



APRSstat: An APRS Network Analysis Tool
by Richard Parry, W9IF
Abstract: APRSstat monitors network traffic by connecting to an APRS telnet server and collecting network traffic statistics. The program is intended to run continuously as a background task on a UNIX/Linux system,. It collects and saves network data for periods as long as a year. The data gathered by APRSstat is plotted using the companion program APRSgraph, which creates graphs as GIF images allowing them to be integrated into a web page. APRSgraph is executed as a cron job every five minutes providing near real time updates of network usage for daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly periods. Characters per minute is used to measure network traffic. A detailed example of the San Diego, California APRS network is included which displayed on the author's home web page. A cursory explanation of the software is also included in the paper. APRSstat and APRSgraph were written in perl and use perl modules GD and Chart for creating the graph GIF images.

Proceedings Paper



Quality Electronic Map Displays for APRS Motor Vehical Navigation
by Bruce Prior, N7RR
Abstract: This paper covers issues regarding how to improve map displays used in vehicles.

Proceedings Paper



An Inexpensive PC-Modem for 76.8kBit/s User Access
by Thomas Sailer, HB9JNX/AE4WA and Johannes Kneip, DG3RBU
Abstract: This article describes a simple and inexpensive modem intended to link end users at 76.8kBit/s to the high-speed backbone network. The modem can be connected to standard PC's using the Enhanced Parallel Port (EPP) Interface.

Proceedings Paper



Take the Next Step with the Next Generation Protocol
by Naoto Shimazaki
Abstract: This document describes an idea for use of IPv6 over the amateur radio network. IPv6 has huge address space and it supports realtime traffic. IPv6 realizes new applications. For example, managing IPv4 address is not easy. It is possible to encode out "callsign" into IPv6 address. It enables us to managing IPaddress much easier.

Proceedings Paper



Half-Duplex Sread Spectrum Networks
by Darryl Smith, VK2TDS
Abstract: This paper is a response to the presentation of the TAPR SS Modem at the 1997 Digital Communications Conference in Baltimore, MD. At this conference, topology's were proposed for use of the SS radios and modems in a network, which the author of this paper feels are rather limiting. This paper proposes to extend the topology's available allowing implementation of a network rather than a collection of communicating nodes. This paper also builds on a number of ideas brought up in the authors undergraduate thesis.

Proceedings Paper



PropNET: A Proposal for an APRS-based Propagation-Research Tool
by Evhen Tupis, W2EV
Abstract: When does the band open? Over what paths did the opening occur? Was it open to more than one location at the same time? Wouldn't it be nice to have been alerted to the opening, while it was in-progress? Wouldn't it be nice to "log the opening", and "re-play" it at a future time? With a minimal investment in equipment and software, you many be able to answer these questions for yourself.

Proceedings Paper



APRS and PropNET: Potential Tools for Collaborative Radio Propagation Research
by Scot Parker, K7LU
Abstract: PropNET is an APRS network operating on the six meter band whose primary objective is to monitor and study radio propagation. There is interest outside (as well as within) the amateur radio community in the long distance propagation modes that PropNET has been designed to study. The possibilities for collaborative research and potential benefits of inter-community cooperation are explored.

Proceedings Paper



Alpha-test report of PRUG96 High-Speed Radio Link
by Shingo Watanabe, JG8OOM, Satoshi Funada, 7M3LCG, and Kunihiko Ohnaka, 7K4JBX
Abstract: The PRUG96 system is designed to create a reliable high-speed ham radio based computer network. This report describes a PRUG96 system using IP network protocol. We have an alpha-test structure to make it clear the weakness point of the system. The difference in the daily data throughput in various environments and error rate trend were measured.

Proceedings Paper



On-Air Measurements of CLOVER II and CLOVER 2000 Throughput
by Ken Wickwire, KB1JY, Mike Bernock, KB1PZ, and Bob Levreault, W1IMM
Concluding Remarks: This paper is part of a series treating on-air measurement of throughput of various HF data-transmission protocols available to amateurs. Here we describe an extensive set of measurements of throughput for text and other files sent using the file transfer protocols implemented in the HAL CLOVERII and CLOVER 2000 terminal and firmware package. The files were transmitted over near-vertical-incidence-skywave (NVIS) and one-hop skywave (OHS) paths. The measured throughput data in our experiments were analyzed using software specially written to compute throughput statistics from our CLOVER data. Throughput statistics for compressed and uncompressed text, data, graphics and hybrid (Word and Excel) files are presented, and text throughput is compared with throughput using PacTOR and GTOR.

Proceedings Paper



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