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Publications:

ARRL and TAPR 18th DCC Proceedings 1999

18th.jpeg

This proceeding is available on CD-ROM


Location:
Phoenix, Arizona

Coordinators:
Greg Jones, WD5IVD
Steve Stroh, N8GNJ

Hosted by:
Motorola Amateur Radio Club of Arizona (MARCA)
Packet Radio Users Group of Japan (PRUG)


Read the conference story with audio and photos.


Abstracts:
18th ARRL and TAPR Digital Communications Conference
September 24-26, 1999

Ham Web Node
by John Bandy, W0UT and Dale Puckett K0HYD
Abstract: This paper describes an existing amateur packet node that provides many graphic and text services to other amateur packet stations in the amateur radio 2 meter band.

Proceedings Paper



Ham Web Station
by John Bandy, W0UT and Dale Puckett K0HYD
Abstract: This paper explains the requirements for an amateur radio station that communicates with an amateur radio web station/node on the 2 meter band. It uses a graphic user interface (GUI) desktop of a personal computer (PC).

Proceedings Paper



A practical Approach to Implementing H.F. Digital Voice in the Amateur Service
by Charles Brain G4GUO
Abstract: This paper describes a practical approach to building a working digital voice system suitable for NVIS operation on the H.F. Amateur bands.

Proceedings Paper



XML and APRS
by Steve Dimse K4HG
Abstract: Recently, a number of pundits have been calling XML (eXtensible Markup Language) the "Next Big Thing" on the Web. New XML aware applications are being released all the time. Over the next few years, more and more information will be made available in XML. The ability to easily machine-interpret this information will be a watershed event in the development of the Internet. APRS will not be left out! In this paper I detail the first efforts in making APRS data available in XML.

Proceedings Paper



Proposal for a Spread Spectrum Transponder Payload on the International Space Station
by Matthew Ettus N2MJI
Abstract: A satellite payload for the International Space Station is proposed, which would provide high bandwidth, wide-area data communications capabilities for radio amateurs. Key features of the system are a simple space segment and low cost ground stations. Varying tiers of service can be provided depending on end-user equipment investment, from low-cost paging, through digital voice and high speed data communication.

Proceedings Paper



A Low-Cost HF Channel Simulator for Testing and Evaluating HF Digital Systems
by Johan Forrer KC7WW
Abstract: The incentive and justification for this project was inspired by the author's desire to develop HF digital communications devices that effectively deal with the variable nature of the ionospheric propagation medium. Simulating the behavior of the ionosphere in real time allows for bench testing of HF modems and other communications devices. In the past, these so-called "HF channel simulators" used exotic and expensive computing hardware that was not available to the average amateur experimenter. The simulator presented in this article is based on a low-cost floating-point DSP evaluation kit that accommodates a wide range of simulated conditions, including CCIR 520-1. The simulation model is an implementation of the Watterson, Gaussian-scatter, HF ionospheric channel model which is the de facto standard for this kind of work. The article concludes with a summary of test results for a number of contemporary, forward error-correcting (FEC) HF digital systems tested on this HF channel simulator: PSK31, CBPSK, and MT63. This simulator is a worthy addition to anyone's array of testing tools for developing DSP modem algorithms, routing or protocol development for HF communication systems.

Proceedings Paper



A Perspective on Open Source, Xastir, Amateur Radio and Linux
by Frank Giannandrea KC0DGE
Abstract: Linux and the Open Source way of thinking have recently been in hot debate throughout the world. Open fighting on this subject has brought out merits on either side of this discussion. Each point of view is applicable in different ways. This is my attempt to discuss how Open Source may be used to benefit Amateur Radio, and how I have used these ideas in my own project.

Proceedings Paper



Automatic Weather Bulletins via APRS
by Dale Huguley KG5QD and Keith Sproul WU2Z
Abstract: This project was an outgrowth of a Pascal-based weather parser located at the Collier County Florida Emergency Operations Center called WXSVR, with stood for Weather Server or Weather Severe. Data from the GTE Weather Wire service was broken into products and made available on the local packet BBS, with hurricane data sent to the statewide network. In February 1997 I met Keith Sproul at the National Hurricane Center during the annual Amateur Radio Conference. I started communication with him and Mark Sproul concerning the use of WinAPRS(tm) for hurricane information display and dissemination. An interface protocol was agreed upon to allow the development of a parser as a possible plug-in to the MacAPRS(tm)/WinAPRS(tm) software. The Parser was originally for hurricanes only, but subsequently was developed for all types of weather bulletins.

Proceedings Paper



(Non Technical) Lessons to be learned from the PSK31 Phenomena
by Jacob Eduardo, EA2BAJ
Abstract: The new PSK31 mode has raised much attention from both the technical press and the hams. We can get on the air from many operating systems using different hardware. We can read about it in many languages, ranging from English to Czech. There have been tests on satellites and on high frequencies. Many contests now include PSK31 as a valid mode. Yet, PSK31 has much more to offer. I believe that we can learn from the experience in benefit of new ham projects for the future.

Proceedings Paper



Arizona Packet Radio, Past Present and Future(?)
by Keith Justice KF7TP and Daniel Meredith N7MRP
Abstract: A brief history of packet radio in Arizona is presented. The current status of the network is described with a map showing node locations and major links, and a detailed node list is available in the Appendix. We speculate on the future, arguing that the Internet, while responsible for the decrease in the current user population, can also provide opportunity for future applications. An application particularly suited to Arizona is the provision of Internet e-mail gateways for the many vacationers, winter visitors, and campers who frequent the state. We are optimistic that other applications, not foreseeable in their exact nature, will certainly emerge.

Proceedings Paper



A software Implementation for Federal Standard 1052 (Mil. Std. 188-110A HF Modems)
by Robert McGwier N4HY
Abstract: Federal Standard 1052 is a modem designed for use on HF. It is specifically designed to overcome the effects of propagation on HF to a certain degree. This paper describes the approach taken by the author in a software implementation for the personal computer. The author has chosen to do the initial implementation on Pentium and Dec-Alpha based computers running Linux.

Proceedings Paper



Next Generation of Amateur Radio Systems
by Paul Rinaldo W4RI
Abstract: The following PowerPoint presentation was originally prepared for a small group of representatives of ARRL, DARC and UBA at Friedrichshafen, Germany. During the discussion, it was acknowledged that HF digital voice was difficult (using LPC-10 or MELP, for example) and that early emphasis should be placed on VHF/UHF multi-media systems. This slide set is offered for your information.

Proceedings Paper



An Inexpensive High Speed Modem for the Universal Serial Bus (USB)
by Thomas Sailer HB9JNX/AE4WA
Abstract: This article describes a simple and inexpensive modem intended to link end users at 76.8kBits/s to the high speed backbone network. The modem can be connected to standard PC's using the Universal Serial Bus (USB).

Proceedings Paper



Automatic Picture Relay Network SSTV Picture Server
by Keith Sproul WU2Z, Douglas Quagliana KA2UPW, and Bob Bruninga WB4APR
Abstract: SSTV, Slow Scan Television, has been around for years. In the past, it was primarily used on HF. The equipment was big, bulky, and somewhat expensive. Nobody even thought of doing SSTV on VHF or portable. With the introduction of the Kenwood VC-H1 this stereotype has changed. This paper discuses software that takes the SSTV images sent from these portable SSTV systems and automatically puts them on a server that makes these pictures available to other Hams. This allows a Ham to send his pictures to a common site that other hams can recalled the pictures from using touch-tone commands. This 'PICTURE SERVER' becomes a 'picture' repeater that also enables hams that do not have a good direct radio path to exchange pictures via this PICTURE NETWORK. In addition, the pictures can be viewed on a local network via Netscape or other web browser.

Proceedings Paper



APRS for X-Windows (Linux)
by Mark Sproul KB2ICI
Abstract: APRS, Automatic Position Reporting System, has been around for most of this decade. Part of the attraction of APRS is that it runs on many different platforms. There are versions that run on DOS, Macintosh, Windows, Palm Pilot, and now the Sproul Brothers (TSB) have introduced a version that runs on LINUX, using X-Windows. This is an important addition to the APRS community because many Hams are starting to use LINUX and there are lots of other Ham Radio related software available for LINUX.

Proceedings Paper



APRS Stand Alone Message Receiver
by Mark Sproul KB2ICI and Keith Sproul WU2Z
Abstract: APRS, Automatic Position Reporting System, has evolved quite a lot over the last eight years. We can run APRS from our home, we can run APRS from our car. We can run with a computer in the car, or we can run with just a tracker unit. In the later case, we have stand alone trackers, we have MIC-Es, PIC-Es and Kenwood Data Radios. In the case of MIC-E's, PIC-Es, and stand-alone trackers, the position data is being transmitted, but the received data is going nowhere. In these cases, for the most part it doesn't matter where the received data goes because we are not in a situation to use that data anyway. However, what if someone wanted to send you a message? If you have a MIC-E, PIC-E, or a standalone tracker, you just can't receive messages. The Kenwood TH-D7 can receive message, but the other tracker units cannot. Wouldn't it be nice if you could receive messages even if you don't have a computer hooked up in your vehicle. In addition, wouldn't it be nicer if we could receive the messages via voice?

Proceedings Paper



Detailed Remote Weather Reporting VIA Packet Radio
by Mark Warbled N8LHG
Abstract: This paper will describe a unique way to view real-time dynamic weather station information via packet radio in extreme detail and accuracy.

Proceedings Paper



APRS GENERIC DIGIPEATING SATELLITES for HT and MOBILE Satellite Communications
by Bob Bruninga WB4APR
Abstract: It's time for mobile and handheld amateur satellite communications and we can do it easily. Proposals for amateur satellite constellations have been made in the past, but they assume a coordinated effort. Such an effort is unrealistic in the catch-as-catch-can amateur environment. This paper suggests that the future growth of amateur satellites can in fact accommodate uncoordinated growth and still provide synergistic advantages to mobile and handheld operations.

Proceedings Paper



APRS Mic-Lite
by Bob Bruninga WB4APR
Abstract: The Mic-Lite is the ultimate APRS Mic-Encoder for maximum flexibility and versatility. It can be plugged into any radio in place of the microphone and gives you instant APRS position, telemetry and message reporting on any Radio. It is assembled from the MIM module and a few off-the-shelf Radio Shack components.

Proceedings Paper



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