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Spread Spectrum:

TAPR's Spread Spectrum STA 1996-1997

The TAPR SS STA has ended. TAPR would like to thank all those that were involved in the SS STA process.

from Report Order WT 97-12 fcc99234.pdf (pdf 62k)

Outstanding Special Temporary Authority grants
1. During the pendency of this proceeding, two Special Temporary Authority (STA) grants authorizing, among other things, certain amateur radio stations to transmit SS emission types that were not permitted by Section 97.311 and to transmit SS emissions on frequency bands not authorized by Section 97.305(c) have remained in force. The first was granted April 17, 1992, to Mr. Robert A. Buaas. The second was granted to two amateur radio licensees who also are TAPR members. Our decision in this proceeding obviates the need for the STAs because it eliminates the restriction on SS emission types that an amateur radio station may transmit. Our decision also does not authorize SS emissions to be transmitted in amateur service frequency bands that are permitted under the STAs. As noted above, the STA granted to Messrs. Jones and Hendricks has expired. We are terminating the STA granted to Mr. Robert A. Buaas as of the date the rules we adopt today become effective, because this Report and Order resolves the issues that formed the basis for granting his request.


History of the TAPR SS STA

  • TAPR files for STA on Spread Spectrum Issues (April 10, 1996).

  • ARRL letter to the FCC regarding TAPR's STA (May 15th, 1996).

  • TAPR's Response to ARRL's letter regarding TAPR's STA (May 24th, 1996).

  • TAPR Requests status on STA (November 6, 1996).

  • TAPR receives STA on Spread Spectrum (November 8, 1996).

  • Robert J. Carpenter, W3OTC, letter regarding TAPR's STA (Nov 20th, 1996).

  • Request for TAPR SS STA Renewal (April 28th, 1997).

  • TAPR SS STA Activity Report, April 1997.

  • List of stations that were on the STA.


Page note: Correction of spelling or other errors in these documents were not made so that they may reflect the exact wording submitted to the FCC. If the authors of any the above information finds a mistake with data entry, please let us know so that we might correct the error. These documents are made available for the general amateur community and are being made available as accurate as possible.


TAPR files for STA on Spread Spectrum Issues

(April 10, 1996)

PDF file of letter (15K).

Federal Communications Commission
April 10, 1996

By Hand

Mr. William Caton
Acting Secretary
Federal Communications Commission
1919 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.  20554

       Re: Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation
           Request for Special Temporary Authority

Dear Mr. Secretary:

The Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation ("TAPR"), by its attorneys,
hereby requests Special Temporary Authority ("STA") for TAPR to conduct an
experimental program to test Code Division Multiple Access ("CDMA") spread
spectrum emissions over amateur radio facilities, as described in greater
detail below. The STA is requested beginning as soon as possible and
continuing for a period of one year. Except for the addition of one
frequency band, as noted below, TAPR is requesting identical authority to
that granted to Mr. Robert A. Buaas (K6KGS) on April 17, 1992.

TAPR was founded in 1982 as a international organization with interests in
the areas of packet and digital communications. Today, TAPR continues as a
membership supported non-profit amateur research and development
organization, and currently has more than 2,000 members worldwide. TAPR
continues to develop kits for the amateur community and is working actively
on publications and communications standards.

TAPR's members have participated in a number of experimental programs
designed to investigate the value of spread spectrum emissions for the
packet radio community, including experiments that later provided the basis
for authorizing spread spectrum modulation in the amateur service. TAPR
plans to continue its leading role in developing standards for spread
spectrum communications for the amateur community through discussion
groups, cooperative efforts and experimental programs such as would be
permitted by the requested STA.  In particular, because of the rapid
development of communications hardware and software, TAPR believes that the
use of hybrid spread spectrum emissions, as well as spreading codes not
envisioned by Section 97.311(d) of the Rules can be employed without
causing harmful interference to other amateur operators.

TAPR proposes to implement an m-sequence as specified in Section
97.311(d)(1) of the Rules as a "generating function." Spreading codes will
be selected from continuous segments of bits produced in the output of the
generating function based on their suitability to provide uniformly
distributed spectral density, code orthogonality and maximum coding gain.
Each spreading code will represent one symbol in the data to be
transmitted. Only the selected spreading codes will be transmitted, and
each will be transmitted in its entirety.

Direct-sequence spread spectrum generators using inexpensive surface
acoustic wave matched filters with fixed spreading codes not related to the
m-sequences specific in Section 97.31(d)(1) will also be used.

Frequency hopping may be evaluated as a means for further distributing the
transmitted energy. Additionally, frequency synthesized homodyne and single
hetrodyne transceivers will be evaluated on each of the frequency bands
proposed, time and resources permitting.

TAPR is requesting STA to fully evaluate the transmission, reception and
processing techniques of CDMA spread spectrum emissions. Specifically, TAPR
will:

* Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed systems;

* Evaluate the potential of spread spectrum overlay on conventional FM systems;

* Study the interference potential of CDMA spread spectrum emissions, if
  any, to existing users of the specified frequency bands;

* Evaluate the resistance of spread spectrum emissions to multipath
  interference;

* Evaluate the ability of spread spectrum emissions to improve spectrum
  efficiency;

* Evaluate the performance improvements potentially offered by CDMA technology;

* Gain operational experience with CDMA spread spectrum techniques; and

* Evaluate the proposals contained in the RM-8737 (Amendment of Part 97 of
  the Commission's Rules Governing the Amateur Radio Service to Facilitate
  Spread Spectrum Communications).

The participants in this experimental will initially be various members of
TAPR who are amateur radio licensees. TAPR requests authority to add
participants, including licensed amateurs who are not members of TAPR,
during the course of the experimental program upon notification to the
Commission of such additions. The experiments will be carried out from the
fixed stations listed on the station licenses of the participants, plus any
portable operations as are permitted under Part 97 of the Commission's
Rules. All participants hold a minimum of a Technical Class license.

TAPR requests authority to operate on the following frequencies: 50-54 MHz,
144-148 MHz, 219-220 MHz, 222-225 MHz, 420-450 MHz, 902-928 MHz, 1240-1300
MHz and 2390-2450 MHz. (1)

The maximum transmitter output power will not exceed 100 watts, and CDMA
spread spectrum emissions will be used.

TAPR expects that the antennas used for this experimental program will
include dipoles, as well as collinear and Yagi arrays with gains of 0 to 12
dBi, at heights up to 30 meters AGL. Only existing, licensed antennas will
be used for this experiment; no new stations will be constructed.

In order to conduct the tests discussed in this letter, TAPR requests the
following Rule waivers:

(1) Waiver of Section 97.305(c) of the Rules is requested to permit
emission type SS in the bands 6m, 2m, and 1.25m;

(2) Waiver of Section 97.311(c) of the Rules is requested to provide for
transmission of hybrid spread spectrum emissions;

(3) Waiver of Section 97.311(d) of the Rules is requested to permit the use
of other spreading codes.

Accordingly, for the reasons stated herein, TAPR respectfully requests
Special Temporary Authority to conduct an experimental program to test CDMA
spread spectrum emissions over amateur radio facilities, as described in
the instant STA request.

Questions with respect to this matter should be directed to the undersigned.

                     Respectfully submitted,

                     Henry Goldberg
                     Attorney for
                     Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation

cc:     Mr. Robert H. McNamara

1       The operational frequencies requested herein are identical to those
granted to Mr. Buaas, except for the 219-220 MHz band, which was not
allocated to the Amateur Radio Service at the time Mr. Buaas filed his STA
request.  To the extent that the addition of the 219-220 MHz band will
significantly delay Commission grant of the instant STA request, TAPR
requests that the STA be granted as soon as possible for all frequency
bands other than 219-220 MHz, and that the 219-220 MHz request be processed
separately.


ARRL letter to the FCC regarding TAPR's STA

(May 15th, 1996)



                  OFFICE OF THE GENERAL COUNSEL
               1233 20th Street, N. W., Suite 204
                    Washington, D. C.  20036
                   Telephone:  (202)  296-9107
                   Facsimile:  (202)  293-1319


                          May 15, 1996

Via Hand Delivery

Robert H. McNamara, Esquire
Chief, Private Wireless Division
Federal Communications Commission
2025 M Street, N.W., 8th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20554

                    Re: Pending Request for Special Temporary
                    Authority, Tucson Amateur Packet Radio
                    Corporation; CDMA Spread Spectrum Tests

Dear Mr. McNamara:

     The American Radio Relay League, Inc. has been made aware of
a request for special temporary authority received in your office
on April 10, 1996, submitted by Goldberg, Godles, Wiener & Wright
on behalf of the Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation (TAPR).

     We understand that the request is defective in that it was not
submitted on behalf of a Commission licensee and that you will
require that a list of licensed participants, with their call
signs, be submitted. With that amendment, the League would endorse
and support most of the requested rule waivers.

     Specifically, waiver of Section 97.311(c) and 97.311(d) is
consistent with the request the League has made in its petition,
RM-8737, that these paragraphs be deleted from the rules.

     With regard to waiver of Section 97.305(c) to the extent
necessary to permit spread spectrum (SS) emission in the bands 6m,
2m, and 1.25m, the League  enthusiastically endorses the requested
authority to use the band 219-220 MHz. Amateur stations using this
frequency band, which is limited to amateur stations participating
as forwarding stations in point-to-point fixed digital message
forwarding systems, are subject to severe geographic limitations
designed to protect the primary Automated Maritime
Telecommunications Systems (AMTS) from interference. The use of SS
emissions would reduce the potential for interference, and might
well permit amateurs to engineer-in a system in closer proximity to
an AMTS licensee than would otherwise be possible. The resulting
increase in efficiency of spectrum occupancy would benefit all
parties. The League notes that the limitations and requirements of
Section 97.303(e) would still apply to stations operating under the
requested STA.

     However, the League has serious concerns with regard to the
proposed use of other frequencies in the 6m, 2m, and 1.25m bands.
The use of these additional frequencies would not appear to be
required by the objectives stated in the STA request. Among these
stated objectives is: "Evaluate the proposals contained in the
RM-8737." RM-8737 is the petition by the ARRL referenced earlier.
RM-8737 makes no proposal for changes in the frequencies authorized
for spread spectrum emission. In its development of the proposals
contained in RM-8737, the League was persuaded that spread spectrum
emissions pose a significant interference potential to existing
amateur operations in these bands. Unlike the situation with regard
to 219-220 MHz, there is no geographic separation requirement that
would protect narrowband users from interference from a nearby
spread spectrum transmitter. While the League is very supportive of
spread spectrum emissions in the Amateur Service and particularly
of continuing experimentation to determine how these emissions can
be used with the least possibility of harmful interference to other
spectrum occupants, with the singular exception of 219-220 MHz
there is nothing in the request to suggest there would be any added
value in conducting these experiments outside the bands where
spread spectrum emissions are already authorized.

     Accordingly, the League supports granting of the STA request,
if amended to show a list of participating stations; and to limit
the waiver of Section 97.305(c) to the band 219-220 MHz.

                                   Yours very truly,

                                   Christopher D. Imlay
                                   General Counsel

cc:  Office of the Secretary
     Henry Goldberg, Esquire


TAPR's Response to ARRL's letter regarding TAPR's STA

(May 24th, 1996)

May 24, 1996

BY HAND

Mr. Robert H. McNamara
Chief, Private Wireless Division
Wireless Bureau
Federal Communications Commission
2025 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.  20554

Re:     Request of Mr. Greg Jones (WD5IVD) and
        Mr. Dewayne Hendricks (WA8DZP), Tucson
        Amateur Packet Radio Corporation ("TAPR"),
        for Special Temporary Authority

Dear Mr. McNamara:

This letter responds to the letter submitted to you on May 15, 1996 by the
American Radio Relay League, Inc. ("ARRL") regarding the above-referenced
request for special temporary authority ("STA").

In its letter, ARRL generally supported the requested STA and, in
particular, 'enthusiastically endorsed' the requested authority to use the
219-220 MHz band.  

The STA applicants and TAPR appreciate ARRL's support and its willingness
to accommodate STA operations in the 219-220 MHz band, in order to promote
the organizations' shared interest in the further development of spread
spectrum technologies.

ARRL, however, expressed concerns about the applicants' proposed use of
other frequencies in the 6m, 2m, and 1.25m bands.  While TAPR and each of
the licensee-applicants shares ARRL's commitment to preventing interference
to existing amateur service operations in these bands, these parties urge
the Commission to grant the STA as requested, permitting operation in each
of the bands originally identified.

Perhaps most importantly, operation in each of these bands already is
permitted pursuant to the spread spectrum STA originally granted to Mr.
Robert A. Buaas in 1992. Under this STA, any amateur station joining the
Buaas project may conduct experiments involving CDMA spread spectrum
transmissions in each of these bands, provided only that notice of their
participation is provided to the Commission.

Mr. Jones and Mr. Hendricks' interest in seeking an STA separate from the
Buaas STA is to permit them, and through them to permit TAPR, to conduct
coordinated research evaluating the transmission, reception, and processing
techniques of CDMA spread spectrum emissions. Through the efforts of its
member licensees, TAPR intends to continue its leading role in developing
standards for spread spectrum communications for the amateur community.
This can be done most efficiently and effectively, however, only if TAPR
through its licensee members is itself in a position to coordinate
participation in the testing and to oversee the program, rather than having
to work through the Buaas STA.

Granting the STA requested by Mr. Jones and Mr. Hendricks, therefore, will
enhance the development of spread spectrum standards without substantively
altering the number of amateur licensees who may transmit CDMA spread
spectrum emissions in the bands questioned by ARRL. As a result, a grant
would not subject existing users of these bands to increased interference
risks.

ARRL's letter also understates the potential benefits of granting the
requested authority to operate in the 6m, 2m, and 1.25m bands. Contrary to
ARRL's suggestion, evaluating the proposals contained in RM-8737 is but one
of TAPR and the licensee's objectives. As a result, the fact that RM-8737
does not propose to permit spread spectrum operation in each of the bands
covered by the STA request does not undermine the need to conduct testing
in these bands. Moreover, the fact that ARRL concluded that a general
authorization for spread spectrum transmissions in these bands could result
in unacceptable interference to existing users of the band, and therefore
decided not to request an amendment to the Part 97 rules authorizing spread
spectrum transmissions in these bands, does not mean that limited spread
spectrum testing, within the constraints imposed by an STA, cannot be
accommodated.

More fundamentally, a great deal can be gained by permitting operation in
these bands. Among other things, TAPR plans to study the strengths and
weaknesses of proposed systems, a variety of potential interference issues,
and the ability of spread spectrum emissions to improve spectrum
efficiency. Through these efforts, TAPR and its licensee members will be
able to improve the factual record for determining whether and, if so,
under what conditions, spread spectrum operations could be more generally
authorized under Part 97 of the Commission's rules. Due to the unique
characteristics of operation in different bands, the type of broad-based
study and analysis TAPR and its members contemplate can be achieved only if
operation is permitted in a variety of different bands, characterized by
different operating frequencies and sharing scenarios.

For the reasons stated herein and in the original STA request, as amended,
the STA applicants and TAPR respectfully request that the Commission grant
the STA request, including authority to operate in the 6m, 2m, and 1.25m
bands.

Respectfully submitted,

Henry Goldberg
Attorney for Tucson Amateur Packet
Radio Corporation

1. ARRL conditioned its support on the substitution of Commission Amateur radio
   licensees as the applicants and a requirement that licensed participants, with
   their call signs, be submitted.  Both of these conditions have been satisfied.
   See Letter from Greg Jones and Dewayne Hendricks to Mr. William Caton,
   dated May 9, 1996.

2. See Letter from Ralph A. Haller to Mr. Robert A. Buaas, dated April 17, 1992
   (attached) (authorizing operation in the 6m (50-54 MHz), 2m (144-148 MHz), and
   1.25m (222-225 MHz) bands).  This STA has been subsequently renewed by the
   Commission since granted in 1992.

3. Id.

4. See STA Request at 2-3.


TAPR requests status of STA

(Nov 6, 1996)

PDF file of letter (10K).


November 6, 1996

By Hand                                  Granted

Mr. William Caton                        Robert H McNamara
Acting Secretary                         Chief, Private Wireless Division
Federal Communications Commission        Wireless Telecommunications Bureau
1919 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.  20554


            Re:   Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation
                  Request for Special Temporary Authority

Dear Mr. Secretary:

   On April 10, 1996, Greg Jones (WD5IVD) and Dewayne Hendricks (WA8DZP)
(collectively, "Applicants") filed a request for Special Temporary 
Authority ("STA"), as amended on May 9, 1996, to allow members of the 
Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation ("TAPR") to conduct an 
experimental program to test Code Division Multiple Access  spread 
spectrum emissions.  At the request of the Commission staff, we hereby 
supplement the April 10 STA request to provide the following information:

   (1)  A list of the initial amateur radio stations in the experimental
        program is attached hereto as Exhibit A.  The Applicants anticipate 
        that additional amateur radio operators, all of whom will hold a 
        at least a Technician Class license, will be added to the 
        experimental program  as it progresses.  The Applicants will 
        file, on a quarterly basis, the names, call signs, and addresses 
        of any additional stations that join the experimental program.

   (2)  In order to conduct the experimental program, the Applicants are 
        requesting that the Commission waive the following provisions of 
        its Rules for the stations:

        (a) Section 97.119(b)(5), to remove the requirement to transmit 
            station identification signals by a CW or phone emission;

        (b) Section 97.305(c), to permit spread spectrum emissions on amateur 
            radio bands  50-54 MHz, 144-148 MHz, 219-220 MHz and 222-225 MHz;

        (c) Section 97.311(c), to provide for transmission of hybrid spread 
            spectrum emissions; and

        (d) Section 97.311(d), to permit the use of other spreading codes. 


   (3)  The Applicants request STA for a period of six months from the 
        date of grant, renewable for additional six-month periods.

   (4)  The Applicants expressly acknowledge that any transmissions 
        conducted pursuant to the requested STA will be secondary in nature, 
        and must cease immediately in the event of harmful interference.

   (5)  The Applicants will file with the Commission a report detailing 
        the results of the experimental program discussed in the STA 
        request, and will make that report available to members 
        of the public.


   Questions with respect to this matter should be directed to the undersigned.



               Respectfully submitted,
                                 
               Greg Jones 
               WD5IVD (Advanced Class)



cc:   Mr. Robert H. McNamara


Robert J. Carpenter, W3OTC, letter regarding TAPR's STA

(Nov 20th, 1996)

                  Robert J. Carpenter, W3OTC
                      12708 Circle Drive
                   Rockville, MD 20850-3713
                               
                       20 November 1996
                                
Chairman,
Federal Communications Commission,
Washington, DC 20554
 
Dear Sir:
 
On November 8, 1996, the Private Wireless Division of the FCC's
Wireless  Telecommunications Bureau  modified the Special Temporary 
Authorization (STA)  issued to Tucson Amateur Packet Radio (TAPR).  
I feel that these  modifications, unless altered, will seriously 
compromise the results of any  experimentation under this STA. 
 
The major thrusts of the STA modification are:  
 
a) allow Spread Spectrum (SS) transmissions on the amateur frequencies
   above 50 MHz, 
 
b) allow the use of any spreading sequence,
 
c) no longer require stations using SS to identify in a manner which
   can be understood on conventional amateur receiving equipment. 
 
Continued is the requirement that test transmissions must be terminated
if they interfere with other amateur communication. 
 
There is widespread alarm among the many users of the heavily populated
amateur bands between 50 and 450 MHz that SS transmissions will
seriously harm the present users.  Thus it is very important that operation 
under the subject STA be conducted in an open manner so that all amateurs 
can participate and observe the results. 
 
I request that the FCC require that users of the TAPR STA post their
operating log, within 24 hours of each period of SS operation, on the 
well-known TAPR site on the World Wide Web (www.tapr.org). The log 
information must include: call letters of station, location, time, frequencies 
employed, power, antenna, SS type, etc.  
 
This requirement would have a number of benefits:

1) without such a public record, other band occupants will have no way of 
   identifying the source of SS transmissions, should there actually be 
   interference, 
 
2) it would demonstrate the technical prowess of TAPR in fielding real tests 
   of real SS equipment, 
   
3) without the open testing this requirement would encourage, the issue
   of SS in amateur radio will remain very contentious and clouded in distrust 
   and misinformation, 

4) it would demonstrate the serious and thorough nature of the tests
   under the STA, 
 
5) by making the SS operation public in nearly real time, it would
   reduce the number of false reports of SS interference, 
 
6) it would allow other users of the bands to correlate their
   observations with the SS STA users (after the fact). 
 
I request that the Commission act immediately to add the above logging
and  posting requirement to the TAPR STA.  It would not hamper experimentation
in  any way.  It is not onerous.  TAPR already possesses all of the necessary
facilities. 
 
Respectfully submitted,
 
 
Robert J. Carpenter
 
cy:
Greg Jones, TAPR
Paul Rinaldo, ARRL



Request for TAPR SS STA Renewal

(April 28, 1997)

Request for TAPR SS STA Renewal (pdf 3.0 format, 5K)

Mr. William Caton
Acting Secretary
Federal Communications Commission
1919 M Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20554


     Re:   Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation
           Request for Renewal of Special Temporary Authority

Dear Mr. Secretary:

On November 6, 1996, Greg Jones (WD5IVD) and Dewayne Hendricks (WA8DZP) (collectively, "Applicants") were granted special temporary authority ("STA") for a period of six months to allow members of the Tucson Amateur Packet Radio Corporation ("TAPR") to conduct an experimental program involving the use of Code Division Multiple Access spread spectrum emissions (see attached). For your information, the attached report outlines the findings of the study complied to date.

The initial six-month period of the TAPR STA ends May 6, 1997. In accordance with the original terms of the STA, the TAPR program is on-going. consequently, the Applicants respectfully request renewal of the TAPR STA, for an additional six months period, with respect to the same set of amateur radio stations for which the original STA was granted.

Questions with respect to this matter should be directed to the undersigned.

Sincerely,

Greg Jones
WD5IVD (Advanced Class)

cc: David E. Horowitz


TAPR SS STA Activity Report

(April 1997)

TAPR SS STA Activity Report, April 1997 (pdf 3.0 format, 418K, 75pages)


List of stations that were on the STA

The following stations were participating in the TAPR SS STA.
Thanks to these stations for participatin.


TAPR Spread Spectrum STA Authorized Stations

Station City, State Date Project Area Coord
Mel Whitten, K0PFX St Louis, MO Nov 8, 96 Yes
Roy D. Welch, W0SL Ballwin, MO Dec 27, 96
Dave Salaman, N0EIR High Ridge, MO Jan 5, 97

Greg Jones, WD5IVD Austin / Denton, TX Nov 8, 96 900Mhz, 2.4G, Exp Yes
Robert Morgan, WB5AOH Austin, TX Nov 8, 96 900Mhz FW, Exp Yes
Jim Neely, WA5LHS Austin, TX Nov 8, 96
Ron Parsons, W5RKN Austin, TX Nov 8, 96
Robert Barron, KA5WSS Austin, TX Dec 27, 96
Brian Straup, NQ9Q Austin, TX Jan 5, 97 Exp
Univ of Texas, ARC, W5EHM Austin, TX Mar 10, 97
Bill Reed, WD0ETZ Dallas, TX Nov 8, 96 Exp
Bob Stricklin, N5BRG Dallas, TX Nov 8, 96 Exp
Tom McDermott, N5EG Murphy, TX Mar 10, 97 Exp
John Koster, W9DDD Dallas, TX Nov 8, 96
Frank Perkins, WB5IPM Arlington, TX Jan 5, 97 Exp
Gerald Knezek, KB5EWV Denton, TX Nov 8, 96 900Mhz TAL
Guy Story, KC5GOI Denton, TX Dec 27, 96
Dorothy Jones, KA5DWR Denton, TX Jan 5, 97 900Mhz TAL
Gerald Marchant, WB5NZV Denton, TX Jan 5, 98 900Mhz TAL
William Jones, KC5UYN Denton, TX Jan 5, 98 900Mhz TAL
Walter Holmes, K5WH Houston, TX Dec 27, 96 Yes

Dewayne Hendricks, WA8DZP San Jose, CA Nov 8, 96 900Mhz TAL Yes
Robert A. Buaas, K6KGS Huntington Beach, CA Dec 27, 96 WL
Robert Lorenzini, WD6DOD Newport Beach, CA Jan 5, 97
David Wright, KD6BUY Fountain Valley, CA Jan 5, 97

Steve Dimse, K4HG Summerland Key, FL Dec 27, 96

Steve Bible, N7HPR Kings Bay, GA Nov 8, 96

John Ackermann, AG9V Dayton, OH Nov 8, 96 900Mhz WL Yes
Fred Peerenboom, KE8TQ Dayton, OH Nov 8, 96 900Mhz WL
Greg Romaniak, N8XOS Parma, OH May 4, 99 900Mhz WL

Jeff King, WB8WKA Farmington, MI Nov 8, 96 900Mhz FW Yes

Steve Stroh, N8GNJ Woodinville, WA Nov 8, 96 Yes
John R. (Dick) Bingham, W7WKR Seattle, WA Mar 10, 97 6meters Exp

Joe Borovetz, WA5VMS Muskogee, OK Nov 8, 96 Yes

Fred Treasure, KE5CI Silver City, NM Jan 5, 97 WL Yes

Anthony W McConnell, N3JLI Phoenix, MD Mar 10, 97 Exp

Anthony Kapolka, III , N3XIH Wilkes-Barre, PA Feb 27, 98 Exp

Legend:

  • 900Mhz, 2m, 219m, etc represent bands that the stations are proposing to operate within
  • Exp - Station has proposed an experiment. Further information will be made available as provided by the experimenting station.

  • Area Coordinators. These are volunteers who can help explain local/regional issues regarding the SS STA.


Questions concerning type of operations, intervals, and schedule should be directed at individual stations if local operators have questions. The STA holders assume that STA participants will work with local amateurs in their area if operational questions or concerns occur. Each STA station has informed TAPR as to an area of work within the STA and these areas are listed above. STA stations will notify the STA holders of any additional changes in operational freqs or scope and these changes will be reflected on this web page as updated.

The STA holders believe that the participants under the STA should be allowed to operate as necessary for their own testing and believe that each STA station fully understands the operational limitations of the STA. It is not the belief of the STA holders that participants under the STA will abuse the purpose and scope of the STA. If this is not the case, the STA holders may upon notice remove anyone from the STA who might be operating outside the limits and scope of the STA.

A formal report on operations will be compiled towards the end of the STA.


Experimental
Greg Jones, WD5IVD, pending experiment using Loral based SS system. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


Experimental
Bill Reed, WD0ETZ, pending experiment using Loral based SS system. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


Experimental
Bob Stricklin, N5BRG, pending experiment using custom built SS technology. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


Experimental
Tom McDermott, N5EG, pending experiment using custom built FHSS technology. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


Experimental
Bob Morgan, WB5AOH, pending experiment using custom built SS technology. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


FW
902-928Mhz. 1 watt output. Frequency Hopper. 15 channels. Operating modes will be in point-to-point, point-to-multipoint, and store & forward repeater. Bi-lateral amp (up to 5 watts) may be used by various stations at discretion and availability. Data rate from 1200bps to 115Kbps.


FW
902-928Mhz. 1 watt output. Frequency Hopper. Operating modes will be in point-to-point, point-to-multipoint. Data rate 256Kbps.


WL
902-928 MHz. 500mW and 1 watt outputs determined by unit. Direct Sequence and DQPSK modulation. 2mbps. Operating modes will be in point-to-point links over 5+km distances for testing links between packet radio switch and server sites and with point-to-multipoint operation within a 3km radius.


Experimental
Brian Straup, NQ9Q, pending experiment using custom built SS technology on 218-219MHz. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


Experimental
Frank Perkins, WB5IPM, pending experiment evaluating usage of DSSS transmissions in the 70 cm band based on DSP signal generation and correlation. More information will be provided prior to equipment being made operational.


Experimental
Anthony W McConnell, N3JLI, pending experiment evaluating usage of FHSS for voice on 6 meters.


Experimental
John R. (Dick) Bingham, W7WKR, pending experiment evaluating usage of FHSS for voice on 6 meters.


Experimental
Some preliminary details are available at my website (http://radio.mathcs.wilkes.edu) . I am working in conjunction with a student, Will Stockdell KB3CBI. We plan to experiment with two configurations: a) computer control of an IC-821, changing frequency. We plan to experiment on 70cm and 2 m. The principal question is how fast we can hop using this radio. b) computer switching between multiple radios set to fixed frequencies. The intent here is to attach the radios to multiple sound cards and switch between them. The number of frequencies using this method will be low (4-8). Again, we plan to experiment on 70cm and 2m.

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